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Domo Knowledge Base

Available Bar Graphs

Important: When referencing this page outside of Knowledge Base, use this link: http://knowledge.domo.com?cid=barcharts

Bar graphs are used to measure quantities or amounts. There are usually two axes, one vertical and one horizontal. One of these axes generally displays the items being measured, and the other displays a numerical scale for measuring the items. The lengths of the bars represent the quantities for the items.

The following tables list the types of Bar graphs available in Domo. You can click a thumbnail image to see a larger image.

Vertical Bar Graphs

Chart Type

Description

Example

Vertical Bar graph

vertical-bar-single-small.png

In a vertical Bar graph, the most common type of bar graph, the categories are represented along the x-axis, or horizontal axis, and the values are represented along the y-axis, or vertical axis.

For more information, see Bar Graph.

Vertical Grouped Bar graph

vertical-bar-grouped-small.png

A vertical Grouped Bar graph is a type of bar graph in which multiple sets of data items are compared, with a single color used to denote a specific series across all the sets. In this way you can compare more information in a single graph.

For more information, see Grouped Bar Graph.

vertical_multibar_kpi_example.png

Vertical Grouped Bar with Line graph

A Grouped Bar with Line graph is a combination of a Line graph and a Grouped Bar graph. It includes two y-axes, one on each side of the graph. One of these is used to measure the values along the line, and the other is used to measure the values of the bars. By default, the first data item appears as a line and all the others appear as bars; however, you can change this in Chart Properties. This type of graph is useful in situations in which you need to show a trend along with the specific quantities or amounts associated with that trend.

For more information, see Grouped Bar with Line Graph.

Vertical Line with Grouped Bar graph

 

This graph type is exactly the same as a Grouped Bar with Line graph except that by default, the first data item appears as a bar and all of the others appear as lines. As with a Grouped Bar with Line graph, you can change this default behavior in Chart Properties.

For more information, see Grouped Bar with Line Graph.

line_with_grouped_bar.png

Vertical Grouped Bar with Curved Line graph

This graph type is exactly the same as a Grouped Bar with Line graph except that the line segments are curved instead of straight. 

For more information, see Grouped Bar with Line Graph.

line_bar_curved_kpi_example.png

Vertical Grouped Bar with Symbols graph

 

A Grouped Bar with Symbols graph is the same as a Grouped Bar with Line graph, except that it includes symbols instead of lines.

For more information, see Grouped Bar with Line Graph.

Vertical Stacked Bar graph

vertical-bar-stacked-small.png

In a vertical Stacked Bar graph, categories are represented as bars, as in a basic Bar graph, but the bars are composed of series that are "stacked" on top of each other, with each series representing its value.

For more information, see Stacked Bar Graph.

Vertical Stacked Bar with Line graph

vertical-bar-stacked-plus-line-small.png

A Stacked Bar with Line graph combines the features of a Line graph and a vertical Stacked Bar graph. There are two y-axes, one on the left and the other on the right. The y-axis on the left measures the values along the line, and the one on the right measures the values of the bars.

For more information, see Stacked Bar with Line Graph.

Vertical Stacked Bar with Curved Line graph

This graph type is exactly the same as a Stacked Bar with Line graph except that the line segments are curved instead of straight. 

For more information, see Stacked Bar with Line Graph.

stacked_bar_with_curved_line_kpi_example.png

Vertical Stacked Bar with Symbols graph

A Stacked Bar with Symbols graph is the same as a Stacked Bar with Line graph, except that it includes symbols instead of lines.

For more information, see Stacked Bar with Line Graph.

Vertical Nested Bar graph

vertical-bar-nested-small.png

In a vertical Nested Bar graph, the total values for all categories are represented as vertical gray bars, and the values for all series are represented as smaller, colored bars and are shown side-by-side in the bars for their respective categories.

For more information, see Nested Bar Graph.

vertical_nested_bar_kpi_example.png

Vertical Nested Bar with Line graph

This graph is a combination of a Grouped Bar with Line graph and Vertical Nested Bar graph. Total values for all categories are represented as vertical gray bars. Of the series, the first series in the legend is represented as a line and all of the other series are represented as smaller, colored bars within their respective category bars. The line and gray total bars are measured on the left vertical axis, and the colored series bars are measured on the right axis. 

For more information, see Nested Bar Graph with Line.  

Vertical 100% Stacked Bar graph

vertical-bar-stacked-100percent-small.png

A vertical 100% Stacked Bar graph is a vertical Stacked Bar graph in which each series in a category represents a percentage of that category, similar to a Pie-type graph.

For more information, see 100% Stacked Bar Graph.

Vertical 100% Stacked Bar with Line graph

A 100% Stacked Bar with Line graph is the same as a 100% Stacked Bar graph in that each series in a percentage stack represents a percentage of that category. It also includes one or more trendlines, similar to our other bar-line combination graphs.

For more information, see 100% Stacked Bar with Line Graph.

Vertical Percent of Total graph

vertical-bar-percent-of-total-small.png

A vertical Percent of Total graph is a vertical Bar graph with a percent scale instead of a value scale—each category bar represents the relative size of its value as a percentage rather than the actual value. Percent of Total graphs are essentially Pie graphs with bars; however, because no legend is required to match names with categories, these graphs are actually easier to read and interpret than Pie-type graphs.

For more information, see Percent of Total Graph.

Vertical Marimekko graph

A Marimekko graph is somewhat similar to a 100% Stacked Bar graph in that items within categories represent a percentage of a category, as in a Pie-type graph. However, it is different in that it represents values through column width as well as height, making it easier to see differences in the values of different items.

For more information, see Marimekko graph.

Pareto graph

A Pareto graph is a bar graph with categories ordered according to the size of their data item (largest to smallest). A line above the bars shows the cumulative value of all of the data items to that point. A Pareto graph has two scales—one on the left that measures the actual data values, and one on the right that measures the percentage of the total value of the data series. These graphs are useful for discerning the impact of certain categories of data on a data series, and they allow you to see those categories that most (or least) contributed to the entire series.

For more information, see Pareto Graph.

Vertical Grouped and Stacked Bar graph

vertical-bar-grouped-and-stacked-small.png

 

Grouped and Stacked Bar graphs combine the features of Grouped Bar and Stacked Bar graphs. In a Grouped and Stacked Bar graph, the first two series of a category are shown side by side, and all additional series are shown as segments in one or both bars. This kind of chart is useful in situations when you want to compare a primary series (such as a series representing sales data for your company headquarters) against several secondary series (such as those series representing sales data for branch offices). In vertical Grouped and Stacked Bar graphs, categories appear on the horizontal axis (or x-axis) and values are measured along the vertical axis (or y-axis).

For more information, see Grouped and Stacked Bar Graph.

Vertical Grouped and Stacked Bar with Line graph

vertical-bar-grouped-and-stacked-plus-line-small.png

A Grouped and Stacked Bar with Line graph is a combination of a vertical Grouped and Stacked Bar graph and a Stacked Bar with Line graph. As in a Stacked Bar with Line graph, two value scales are present and series can appear as either lines or bars; this chart type also gives you the ability to divide series segments between bars, as in a Grouped and Stacked Bar graph. As with standard Grouped and Stacked Bar graphs, this chart type is useful when you want to compare a primary series against several secondary series; however, because it includes a trendline, it is more compatible with time-series data than a regular Grouped and Stacked Bar graph.

For more information, see Grouped and Stacked Bar with Line Graph.

Vertical Bullet graph

Bullet graphs are used to depict progress towards a goal, and contain two or more ranges (for example, "poor," "average," and "excellent"). Unlike other kinds of gauges, which represent a single data value, Bullet graphs can measure multiple data values in a smaller space, providing a richer and more meaningful viewing experience. In Vertical Bullet graphs, categories appear on the horizontal axis (or x-axis) and the category values are measured along the vertical axis (or y-axis).

For more information, see Bullet Graph.

vertical_bullet_graph_kpi_example.png

Vertical Waterfall graph

Waterfall graphs are essentially Bar graphs that show a series of profits and losses for a specified time period, together with a summary bar showing the amount remaining at the end of the time period. Profits appear as green bars, losses appear as red bars, and start and summary bars appear as blue bars. By default, Waterfall graphs display only value and category data, but you can show summary bars for individual series by checking a box in Chart Properties. In vertical Waterfall graphs, categories appear on the horizontal axis (or x-axis) and category values are measured along the vertical axis (or y-axis).

For more information, see Waterfall Graph.

Vertical Running Total Bar graph

In a Running Total Bar graph, each successive category bar shows the cumulative value of all categories up to that point in the succession. In a Running Total Bar graph, each category contains only one series, so only one bar displays for each data point.

For more information, see Running Total Bar Graph.

Vertical Running Total Grouped Bar graph

In a Running Total Grouped Bar graph, multiple series are present for two or more categories, and these series are shown side by side, as in a vertical Grouped Bar Graph. Each series bar shows the cumulative value for all series bars in that category up to that point.

For more information, see Running Total Grouped Bar Graph.

Vertical Running Total Stacked Bar graph

In a Running Total Stacked Bar graph, multiple series are present for two or more categories, and these series are shown stacked on top of each other, as in a vertical Stacked Bar Graph. Each bar in a stack shows the cumulative value for all series bars in that category up to that point.

For more information, see Running Total Stacked Bar Graph.

Vertical Overlay Bar graph

A Vertical Overlay Bar is similar to a standard Stacked Bar graph except that instead of being stacked, all series items begin from the baseline, so overlapping of series items occurs in a category when multiple series are present. In its initial non-rollover state, an Overlay graph is rather meaningless, as shown in the first example at right. However, by mousing over a series item in the legend, you can see just that series in the chart, as shown in the second example at right. In many applications this may be more useful than a Stacked Bar because you can more quickly compare series items in different categories. (In a Stacked Bar this is difficult because series in different categories do not usually begin from the same baseline.)

For more information, see Overlay Bar Graph

 

Vertical Histogram graph

A Histogram is a chart type, usually used for statistical analysis, that represents the frequency at which certain ranges of values appear in a DataSet. For example, you could create a histogram showing the frequency at which specific height ranges appear in a group. In a vertical Histogram, values are represented along the x-axis as ranges, and categories are counted and represented numerically on the y-axis.

For more information, see Histogram.

vertical_histogram_kpi_example.png

Horizontal Bar Graphs

Chart Type

Description

Example

Horizontal Bar graph

horizontal-bar-single-small.png

A horizontal Bar graph has the same basic concept as a vertical Bar graph, but the x- and y-axes are reversed; that is, the categories are represented along the y-axis, or vertical axis, and the values are represented along the x-axis, or horizontal axis.

For more information, see Bar Graph.

Horizontal Grouped Bar graph

A horizontal Grouped Bar graph has the same basic concept as a vertical Grouped Bar graph, but the x- and y-axes are reversed, so that the categories are represented along the y-axis, or vertical axis, and the values are represented along the x-axis, or horizontal axis.

For more information, see Grouped Bar Graph.

Horizontal Grouped Bar with Line graph

A horizontal Grouped Bar with Line graph has the same basic concept as a vertical Grouped Bar with Line graph, but the x- and y-axes are reversed, so that the categories are represented along the y-axis, or vertical axis, and the values are represented along the x-axes, or horizontal axes. Bars are measured on the bottom x-axis and lines are measured on the top x-axis. 

For more information, see Grouped Bar with Line Graph.

Horizontal Grouped Bar with Symbols graph

A horizontal Grouped Bar with Symbols graph is the same as a horizontal Grouped Bar with Line graph but uses symbols instead of lines.

For more information, see Grouped Bar with Line Graph.

Horizontal Stacked Bar graph

horizontal-bar-stacked-small.png

A horizontal Stacked bar graph has the same basic concept as a vertical Stacked Bar graph, but the x- and y-axes are reversed, so the series appear side-by-side in the chart rather than stacked on top of each other.

For more information, see Stacked Bar Graph.

Horizontal Stacked Bar with Line graph

A horizontal Stacked Bar with Line graph has the same basic concept as a vertical Stacked Bar with Line graph, but the x- and y-axes are reversed, so that the categories are represented along the y-axis, or vertical axis, and the values are represented along the x-axis, or horizontal axis. Bars are measured on the bottom x-axis and lines are measured on the top x-axis. 

For more information, see Stacked Bar with Line Graph.

Horizontal Stacked Bar with Symbols graph

A horizontal Stacked Bar with Symbols graph is the same as a horizontal Stacked Bar with Line graph but uses symbols instead of lines.

For more information, see Stacked Bar with Line Graph.

Horizontal Nested Bar graph

horizontal-bar-nested-small.png

A horizontal Nested Bar graph has the same basic concept as a vertical Nested Bar graph, but the x- and y- axes are reversed, so the bars extend to the right instead of vertically.

For more information, see Nested Bar Graph.

Horizontal Nested Bar with Line graph

A horizontal Nested Bar with Line graph has the same basic concept as a vertical Nested Bar with Line graph, but the x- and y- axes are reversed, so the bars extend to the right instead of vertically, and the line goes from top to bottom.

For more information, see Nested Bar with Line graph.

Horizontal Marimekko graph

A horizontal Marimekko graph has the same basic concept as a vertical Marimekko graph but the categories are on the x-axis and the percent scale is on the y-axis, so the rectangles extend left to right instead of top to bottom.

For more information, see Marimekko graph.

Horizontal 100% Stacked Bar graph

horizontal-bar-stacked-100percent-small.png

A horizontal 100% Stacked Bar graph has the same basic concept as a vertical 100% Stacked Bar graph, but the x- and y-axes are reversed, so the series appear side-by-side in the chart rather than stacked on top of each other.

For more information, see 100% Stacked Bar Graph.

Horizontal 100% Stacked Bar with Line graph

A 100% Stacked Bar with Line graph is the same as a 100% Stacked Bar graph in that each series in a percentage stack represents a percentage of that category. It also includes one or more trendlines, similar to our other bar-line combination graphs.

For more information, see 100% Stacked Bar with Line Graph.

Horizontal Percent of Total graph

horizontal-bar-percent-of-total-small.png

A horizontal Percent of Total graph is the same as a vertical Percent of Total graph, but the x and y axes are reversed, so that the percent scale appears on the bottom and the categories on the left.

For more information, see Percent of Total Graph.

Horizontal Grouped and Stacked Bar graph

horizontal-bar-grouped-and-stacked-small.png

Horizontal Grouped and Stacked Bar graphs have the same basic concept as vertical Grouped and Stacked Bar graphs, but the x- and y-axes are switched, so that the categories appear on the vertical axis and the values are measured along the horizontal axis.

For more information, see Grouped and Stacked Bar Graph.

Horizontal Grouped and Stacked with Line graph

This chart type is the same as a vertical Grouped and Stacked with Line graph, , but the x- and y-axes are switched, so that the categories appear on the vertical axis and the values are measured along the horizontal axes.

For more information, see Grouped and Stacked Bar with Line graph.

Horizontal Bullet graph

Horizontal Bullet graphs have the same basic concept as vertical Bullet graphs, but the x- and y-axes are switched, so that the categories appear on the vertical axis and the values are measured along the horizontal axis.

For more information, see Bullet Graph.

horizontal_bullet_graph_kpi_example.png

Horizontal Waterfall graph

Horizontal Waterfall graphs have the same basic concept as vertical Waterfall graphs, but the x- and y-axes are switched, so that the categories appear on the vertical axis and the values are measured along the horizontal axis.

For more information, see Waterfall Graph.

horizontal_waterfall_kpi_example.png

Horizontal Running Total Bar graph

Horizontal Running Total Bar graphs are the same as vertical Running Total Bar graphs, but the x- and y-axes are switched, so that the categories appear on the vertical axis and the values are measured along the horizontal axis.

For more information, see Running Total Bar Graph.

Horizontal Running Total Grouped Bar graph

Horizontal Running Total Grouped Bar graphs are the same as vertical Running Total Grouped Bar graphs, but the x- and y-axes are switched, so that the categories appear on the vertical axis and the values are measured along the horizontal axis.

For more information, see Running Total Grouped Bar Graph.

Horizontal Running Total Stacked Bar graph

Horizontal Running Total Stacked Bar graphs are the same as vertical Running Total Stacked Bar graphs, but the x- and y-axes are switched, so that the categories appear on the vertical axis and the values are measured along the horizontal axis.

For more information, see Running Total Stacked Bar Graph.

Funnel Bars graph

A Funnel Bars graph is a combination of a Funnel graph and a horizontal Bar graph. This graph type shows differences between one stage in a process (such as a sales cycle) and the next. For each stage in the process, the data for the previous round drops off, so that only the relationships between the current round and all subsequent rounds is shown. In essence, this chart type shows "what's left" after each stage in a process. The example at right shows a Funnel Bars graph for a typical sales cycle. Each subsequent stage depicts the number of potential customers who have progressed to that stage.

For more information, see Funnel Graph.

Horizontal Overlay Bar graph

A horizontal Overlay Bar graph is the same as a vertical Overlay Bar graph, x- and y-axes are switched, so that the categories appear on the vertical axis and the values are measured along the horizontal axis.

For more information, see Overlay Bar graph.

Horizontal Histogram graph

A horizontal Histogram is the same as a vertical Histogram, but the axes are reversed, so that category counts appear on the horizontal x-axis and value ranges appear on the vertical y-axis.

For more information, see Histogram.

horizontal_histogram_kpi_example.png

Miscellaneous Bar Graphs

Though technically a vertical Bar graph, the Spark Bar graph is included here because it is vastly different in many respects from standard Bar graphs. This graph type is found in the Other Charts category in the Chart Picker.   

Chart Type

Description

Example

Spark Bar graph

spark-bar-small.png

A Spark Bar graph is essentially a Bar graph with no axes (providing a cleaner, uncluttered experience) and a built-in gauge that by default shows the degree of change between the first and last data points in the graph. Spark Bar graphs are excellent for quickly showing relative rises and falls in data over time. 

For more information, see Spark Bar Graph.

spark_bar_kpi_example.png