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Domo Knowledge Base

Available Miscellaneous Charts

Version 5

 

Important: When referencing this page outside of Knowledge Base, use this link: http://knowledge.domo.com?cid=misccharts

The following table lists the types of miscellaneous graphs available in Domo. You can click a thumbnail image to see a larger image.  

Chart Type

Description

Example

Radar graph

 

A Radar graph is essentially a collection of Line graphs that encircle a centralized point (representing zero) on a polygonal grid. Each vertex of the grid pertains to a different category, and series are represented as individual colored polygons within the graph, with values plotted at the vertices of each polygon.

Radar graphs are used when you want to compare aggregate values for two or more data series. In the example at right, the ACT scores for three job candidates are compared using a Radar graph. You can see from the size and shape of each polygon that the candidates named "Feldman" and "Murtz" were strong in two categories and weak in the others, while the candidate named "Hubbbard" was strong in all four categories.

For more information, see Radar Graph.

 

Word Cloud

A Word Cloud is a visual representation of text data, in which the importance or frequency of individual words is represented using font size and color. This format allows users to spot the most important or frequently used words in the DataSet. The example shows a Word Cloud showing top-searched terms for an electronics company. The size and color of each word represents the number of times it is used in searches—the more frequently a word was searched for, the larger and more brightly colored it is.

For more information, see Word Cloud Chart.

Heat Map

A Heat Map is a special type of graph in which both the X and Y axes contain category data. Rectangle colors vary depending on how a particular data point fits into the specified data ranges. No series data is represented. Heat maps allow you to visualize relationships between data categories and draw attention to "hot spots" of activity and trends. In the example at right, the intensity of the blue color indicates the number of venomous snakes that were encountered in four Florida cities during a certain time period. The darkest blue areas appear for Miami, showing that it was a particular hotspot for snake activity.

For more information, see Heat Map.

Calendar

A calendar is used to show events associated with a series of dates. You can choose whether your calendar shows data for an entire year, for a month, or for a single day.

For more information, see Calendar.

Vertical Box Plot graph

Box Plot graphs are commonly used to represent statistics and quality measurements. For any given category, at least five values are required in the DataSet. From these values, Domo derives a high value, a Q3 (Quartile 3) value, a median value, a Q2 (Quartile 2) value, and a low value. These values are plotted on the graph as a box and whisker plot, with the Q1, median, and Q3 values forming the box and the high and low values forming the "whiskers."

In a vertical Box Plot graph, values are represented on the vertical axis (or y-axis) and categories are represented on the horizontal axis (or x-axis) so the boxes stretch from top to bottom.

For more information, see Box Plot Graph.

vertical_boxplot_kpi_example.png

Horizontal Box Plot graph

Horizontal Box Plot graphs are the same as vertical Box Plot graphs, except that categories are represented on the vertical axis (or y-axis) and values are represented on the horizontal axis (or x-axis), so the boxes stretch from left to right rather than top to bottom.

For more information, see Box Plot Graph.

horizontal_boxplot_kpi_example.png

Gantt chart

Gantt charts are used to illustrate project schedules. Each task in your DataSet is represented as a horizontal bar with a start date and end date. If you want, you can break tasks down by project, with each project category shown in a separate color; however, this is optional.

For more information, see Gantt Chart.

Gantt Percent Complete chart

A Gantt Percent Complete chart is a sub-type of the standard Gantt chart. The only difference in a Gantt Percent Complete chart is that it requires an additional column containing the percent complete values for each task. In the chart, these values are represented by the amount of colored fill in each task bar. The amount of fill compared to the total length of the task bar gives the viewer an idea of the percentage complete for that task. For example, in the screenshot at right, the percent complete for "Google+ profile" is about 33%.

For more information, see Gantt Chart.

High Low graph

A High Low graph is used to represent stock data. For any given category, a vertical line is shown. The topmost point of the line represents the highest price for a stock and the bottommost point represents the lowest price for that stock.

For more information, see High Low Graph.

Candlestick graph

A Candlestick graph is used to represent stock data. This chart type is the same as a High Low graph but requires two additional dimensions. For any given category, a graphic is shown consisting of a box with lines protruding from the top and bottom. As in a High Low graph, the ends of the lines represent the high and low prices for the stock respectively. The top and bottom boundaries of the box represent the opening and closing prices of the stock. If the opening price of the stock is lower than the closing price (that is, the stock gained value), the graphic appears green. If the opening price is higher than the closing price (that is, the stock decreased in value), the graphic appears red.

For more information, see Candlestick Graph.

Category Scatter graph

A Category Scatter graph is similar to a Scatter Plot graph in that items are plotted using X-Y coordinates. However, whereas in a Scatter Plot graph two value scales are present, in a Category Scatter graph categories are listed down the y-axis, as in a horizontal Bar graph, and values are measured on the x-axis. Series data is optional for a Category Scatter graph; however, no legend is provided—you must mouse over an item to see its series.
For more information, see Category Scatter Graph.

Vertical Symbol graph

Symbol graphs are similar to Grouped Bar graphs in that series items are represented side by side within their respective categories. However, instead of bars, Symbol graphs use symbols to indicate series values. This may help viewers to more easily identify highs and lows within their data. In a vertical Symbol graph, categories are represented along the horizontal axis (or x-axis) and values are measured on the vertical axis (or y-axis).

For more information, see Symbol Graph.

vertical_symbol_kpi_example.png

Horizontal Symbol graph

 

A horizontal Symbol graph is the same as a vertical Symbol graph except that the axes are switched; categories are measured on the vertical axis (or y-axis) and values are measured on the horizontal axis (or x-axis).

For more information, see Symbol Graph.

horizontal_symbol_kpi_example.png

Vertical Symbol Overlay

Symbol Overlay graphs are similar to standard Symbol graphs. However, where in a Symbol graph symbols in categories are shown side by side (as in a Grouped Bar graph), in a Symbol Overlay graph symbols in categories are overlaid on top of one another (like the individual bars in a category in a Stacked Bar graph). As with a Symbol graph, viewers can easily identify the highs and lows in each category. In a vertical Symbol Overlay graph, categories are represented along the horizontal axis (or x-axis) and values are measured on the vertical axis (or y-axis).

For more information, see Symbol Overlay Graph.

Horizontal Symbol Overlay

A horizontal Symbol Overlay graph is the same as a vertical Symbol Overlay graph except that the axes are switched; categories are measured on the vertical axis (or y-axis) and values are measured on the horizontal axis (or x-axis).

For more information, see Symbol Overlay Graph.

horizontal_symbol_overlay_kpi_example.png

Spark Line graph

spark-line-small.png

A Spark Line graph is essentially a Line graph with no axes (providing a cleaner, uncluttered experience) and a built-in gauge that by default shows the degree of change between the first and last data points in the graph. Spark Line graphs are excellent for quickly showing relative rises and falls in data over time. 

For more information, see Spark Line Graph.

spark_line_kpi_example.png

Spark Bar graph

spark-bar-small.png

A Spark Bar graph is essentially a Bar graph with no axes (providing a cleaner, uncluttered experience) and a built-in gauge that by default shows the degree of change between the first and last data points in the graph. Spark Bar graphs are excellent for quickly showing relative rises and falls in data over time. 

For more information, see Spark Bar Graph.

spark_bar_kpi_example.png